Speaker Series

Each year, our speaker series includes nationally and internationally renowned psychoanalysts, some of whom are members of our own Society. Typically, the speaker presents an unpublished paper or other original material on a topic that is at the cutting edge of modern psychoanalytic theory and technique.

Nov 14, 2020, 3:00-4:30pm- Lynne Layton PhD - Toward a Social Psychoanalysis: Culture, Character, and Normative Unconscious Processes

Date:

November 14, 2020, 3:00-4:30pm

Title:

Toward a Social Psychoanalysis: Culture, Character, and Normative Unconscious Processes

Lynne Layton PhD, Psychoanalyst and Activist

Massachusetts Institute for Psychoanalysis

Abstract:

Beginning with Fromm’s assertion of a “social unconscious” and vignettes from the 50s and 60s that illustrate how clinical interpretations can contribute to reproducing a sexist status quo and particular kinds of character, the presentation speaks to how unconscious psychosocial processes permeate identity formation and clinical work. Examples of racist, sexist, and classist enactments in the clinic and culture demonstrate the workings of normative unconscious processes that sustain cultural and power inequalities. Such enactments are not considered “mistakes,” but rather demonstrate the way identities of both patients and therapists are formed by cultural demands to split off and project ways of being human deemed not “proper” to occupying their given social position. The talk concludes with thoughts about contemporary social forces that contribute to white middle-class subject formation and white middle-class symptoms, focusing again on unconscious collusions that stem from both culture and clinic.

Clinicians, academics, and activists alike will find here a deeper understanding of the power of unconscious process, and are called on to envision and enact a progressive future in which vulnerability and interdependency are honored and systemic inequalities dismantled.

Bio:

Lynne Layton PhD is part-time faculty at Harvard University in the Department of Psychiatry, supervises at the Massachusetts Institute for Psychoanalysis and teaches at the Pacifica Graduate Institute. Author of numerous articles on psychoanalysis, relational approaches, gender, and social justice, she has also authored two influential books, Who’s That Girl, Who’s That Boy? Clinical; Practice Meets Postmodern Gender Theory and most recently, Towards a Social Psychoanalysis. She has co-edited a number of collections and co-edited the journal, Psychoanalysis, Culture, and Society. She works towards creative ways to integrate her commitments to psychoanalysis and to social justice.

Details:

Clinicians may claim 1.5 units of CME or CEU credit.

This program is free for all, but everyone must register by Friday November 13th.  The Zoom registration link is as follows:  https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMlf-yqrDItGNyLzNp1YGo-b69YoVSIciSE

Dec 12, 2020, 3:00-4:30pm- Paola Mieli PhD - On the Role of Preliminary Sessions in the Direction of the Cure

Date:

December 12, 2020, 3:00-4:30pm

Paola Mieli PhD, Psychoanalyst

Après-Coup Psychoanalytic Association (President), New York

Title:

On the Role of Preliminary Sessions in the Direction of the Cure

Abstract:

Clinical understanding and the direction of the cure in psychoanalysis differ from that of all other clinical practices. They imply a particular way of listening within the framework of the transference. In this regard, preliminary sessions play an essential part: they have the specific function of recognizing the question underlying a person’s symptoms or malaise. It is important to identify the structural question that lies behind the so called “presenting problems” – psychosomatic symptoms, anxieties, inhibitions, compulsions, depression, and so on – and moves the subject towards treatment. Such identification permits the establishment of the appropriate frame or setting of the cure, laying out its possible direction, always unique and particular. The beginning of a cure may be decisive for its ending.

Bio:

Paola Mieli, PhD is a psychoanalyst practicing in New York City. She holds a Doctorate in Philosophy and a PhD in Psychopathology and Psychoanalytic Research. She is a founding member and president of Après-Coup Psychoanalytic Association (New York). She is a member at Le Cercle Freudien (Paris), at Espace Analytique (Paris), an honorary member of The European Federation of Psychoanalysis (Strasbourg), and an Associate Researcher at the Centre de Recherches en Psychanalyse, Medicine et Société at the University of Diderot – Paris VII. She is the author of numerous articles on psychoanalysis and on culture published in Europe and America. Her books include: Figures of Space. Subject, Body, Place ; A Silver Martian–Normality and Segregation in Primo Levi’s Sleeping Beauty in the Fridge; Sobre as manipulaçaões irreversívels do corpo, and a co-editor of  Being Human: The Technological Extensions of the Body.

Details:

Clinicians may claim 1.5 units of CME or CEU credit.

This program is free for all, but everyone must register. The Zoom registration link is as follows: 

https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMuce6uqT8iEtMPBf9CjB9D965J0KSLAyRH

Feb 20 & 21, 2021- Dionne Powell, MD – Good Trouble: how psychoanalysts can get out of their own way when it comes to race

Date:

February 20th and 21st, 2021

Dionne Powell, MD, Psychoanalyst, New York

Atlanta Psychoanalytic Society Lecture:

Title:

Good Trouble: how psychoanalysts can get out of their own way when it comes to race

Abstract:

Psychoanalysts often refer to themselves as liberal and non-racist, this reflexive response occurs simultaneous with the oft practiced frame of neutrality, anonymity and abstinence. While this may be the case politically, the effect of growing up or living within a country that codifies race with systemic foundational consequences on every aspect of life has to affect the psychoanalyst in terms of whom and how we treat patients. This presentation looks at race as unconsciously structuralizing along with our defenses against this recognition. Only by understanding these impediments can we become more mindful to the intransigence of racism as it has an effect on our working function as analysts. Clinical examples will be provided to illustrate these themes.

Lecture for Georgian Psychiatric Physicians Association:

Title:

Racial Silence: bringing race and ethnicity into the clinical and training situation

Abstract:

In a time of pandemic, social unrest, social distancing and isolation, with the omnipresent manifestation of climate change, these accumulative adverse events have taxed the most resilient in our population requiring increased demands on mental health services. Nowhere is this greatest than among the “essential workers” of lower income and marginalized communities of color. However the history of black and brown people and psychiatry has been fraught by a legacy of discrimination, systemic racism and bias, and pathologizing leading to pity and support rather than active engagement to mitigate the challenges faced by black and brown communities along with addressing the general “pathology of everyday life” (S. Freud, 1917). This talk addresses this legacy and explores ways, when it comes to race, that the clinician’s silence has harmed our patients of color. The talk provides theories of why this harm exists, and suggestions on addressing and reducing the effects of institutional racism and the trans-generational transmission of trauma that has particular deleterious effects on African Americans, while also affecting our nation’s ability to heal from our complicated racial past.

Bio:

Dionne Powell is a psychiatrist and psychoanalyst in private practice in New York. Recently, she is a fellow in the Practice of Adult Psychoanalysis (American Board of Psychoanalysis), an Adjunct Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the New York Presbyterian Hospital (Columbia University Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research), a Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and an Assistant Attending Psychiatrist at the New York Presbyterian Hospital for the Weill Cornell Medical College. Dr. Powell is a Training and Supervising Psychoanalyst at the Columbia University Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research and at the Psychoanalytic Association of New York (affiliated with NYU School of Medicine). She is also Vice President of the American Association of Psychoanalytic Education. Dr. Powell has published and presented her work widely, most recently in Psychoanalytic Quarterly; Psychoanalytic Perspectives on Women and Their Experience of Desire, Ambition and Leadership, published by Routledge; and the Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association.

Details:

TBD

May 1, 2021, 11:00am - Alain Vanier MD, PhD - The premature baby and the psychoanalyst

Date:

May 1, 2021, 11:00am

Alain Vanier MD, PhD Psychoanalyst

Espace Analytique; Emeritus Professor, Université Paris 7 Diderot (Paris)

Title:

Object Relations in the Lacanian School:  Lacan’s objet a

Abstract:

North American psychoanalysts often believe that the main innovation of Lacan is his emphasis on the significance of language in terms of the “divided” subject and in the direction of the treatment. Yet, this is hardly exhaustive. This presentation introduces a less well known dimension of Lacan’s thinking in the United States, elements of the conception of Lacan’s  “only invention” as he said, that of the object a. We may understand this “object, as the ‘object between the mother and child” which, like Winnicott’s transitional object, is so critical in orienting clinical practice. The function of the object a is foundational in Lacan’s understanding of fantasy, in how one functions within transference, and with respect to anxiety and affect.  Although a lost object, simply as a consequence of symbolization itself, its libidinal effects reveal the psychic space between subject and the investments that constitute the subject’s world.  Understanding Lacan’s invention, object a, will be discussed through clinical lenses and examples. But for Lacan and as is apparent today, the elusive object of desire is ever present in late capitalism, with its “contemporary discontents.”

Bio: Alain Vanier is a psychoanalyst practicing in Paris, a member and president of Espace Analytique.  He is the author of numerous articles on psychoanalysis and culture published internationally, most recently in English: “Winnicott and Lacan : A Missed Encounter?” in The Psychoanalytic Quarterly; “The object between mother and child: From Winnicott to Lacan,” in Between Winnicott and Lacan: A Clinical Engagement; ”Fear, Paranoia and Politics,” in The Psychoanalytic Review; and the book, Lacan. He is Emeritus Professor of Psychopathology and Psychoanalysis and the Director of graduate studies at the University of Paris Diderot – Paris 7, where he was at the head of the Centre de Recherches Psychanalyse,Médecine et Société (C.R.P.M.S.).

Details:

TBD

May 1, 2021, 3:00pm - Catherine Vanier, PhD - The premature baby and the psychoanalyst

Date:

May 1, 2021, 3:00pm

Catherine Vanier, PhD, Psychoanalyst

Espace Analytique, Director, L’École Expérimentale de Bonneuil sur-Marne (Paris)

Title:

The premature baby and the psychoanalyst

Abstract:

Starting from the clinical experience of a psychoanalyst in a child intensive care unit,   we will try to see how today we can psychoanalytically approach the effects of premature birth on the baby and his family. To understand the psychological complications of neonatal resuscitation, which is often a long and difficult process, we first he is constituted. What about the mother-child bond in those cases? Such questions lead to questions about the place of the child in the parental fantasy and about the effects of hospitalization have to try to see how a baby’s psyche on the child at the beginning of his life. Knowing the medical staff is deeply implicated in the life of the premature infant, the presentation examines how anxiety-producing those resuscitations are for all who are involved. The doctors also realize that each body, inscribed in a different speech, is different; that their knowledge, which concerns the organic/biological body in general, clashes against the truth of the particular body of each one of us. Technology here often encounters its own limits and in certain cases, the child’s reaction to treatment escapes all logic. However, doctor’s role is important because we will see how the caring gestures and words that accompany the baby can give him a sense of existence.

Bio: Catherine Vanier is a psychoanalyst in Paris; member and past président of Espace Analytique, head of L’École Expérimentale de Bonneuil-sur-Marne; faculty, Après-Coup Psychoanalytic Association. She has authored two books translated into English: Lacanian Psychotherapy with Children: The Broken Piano (authored as C. Mathelin); and Premature birth : the baby, the doctor, and the psychoanalyst.

Details:

TBD

June, 2021- APS Dinner with candidate paper prize

Date:

TBD; June, 2021

Event:

APS Dinner with candidate paper prize

Location & Time:

TBD

Continuing Education Units

The American Psychoanalytic Association will grant CME credits for the listed educational activities.  Our activities have been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and Standards of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint sponsorship of the American Psychoanalytic Association and the Atlanta Psychoanalytic Society. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACME to offer continuing medical education to physicians. The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. CEU credits will be provided for Social Workers, LPCs, and LMFTs.

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial interests to disclose.

More Information

While we continue to navigate the global pandemic, for the safety of our members and the community, we will meet through online teleconference via Zoom.

For questions about meeting dates, times, locations and CME credit, contact the Program Committee Chairs.  If you plan to attend an event, please send an email to Melinda Robb, LMSW to RSVP.

Melinda Robb, LMSW
melinda.robb@emory.edu.

Kareen Ror Malone, PhD, LPC
kmalone@westga.edu